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What is Agarwood and Oud Oil?

Agarwood is the resinous heartwood that comes from the Aquilaria tree. The Aquilaria tree is a fast-growing subtropical forest tree that is endemic in the Philippines.

When Agarwood is distilled into an oil, it produces one of the most valuable raw commodities in the world – Agarwood tree oil also known as “OUD OIL”. Oud Oil is the key ingredient in some of the most expensive fragrances in the world. Top name brands like Versace, Calvin Klein, Hugo Boss to name a few, all have premium fragrance lines that feature Oud Oil. Due to its high demand and limited supply, high grade Oud Oil has sold for over USD 50,000 per kilogram.

The current global market for “Oud Oil” and other related Agarwood products is over USD 12 Billion Annually and is growing rapidly. The global fragrance industry is by far the major buyer of Oud Oil and global agarwood and oud oil sales are expected to exceed US$ 36 billion by 2030.

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Aquilaria Crassna

Aquilaria crassna is a big tree that can reach 30 meters in height. The diameter of the trank varies from 0.6 to 0.9 m. The bark is greyish brown. The leaves are ovate oblong and oval. Their length varies from 5 to 11 cm in width. The edges are hair. The flowers are small and pale yellow. The calyx is bell-shaped. The flower about 4 cm long and 3 cm in diameter.

Aquilaria crassna is an evergreen tree with an open crown; usually growing 15 – 20 metres tall but with exceptional specimens to 30 metres. The bole is 40 – 60cm in diameter, exceptionally to 100cm.
The aromatic resin obtained from this tree is one of the most famous and most expensive on the planet. It has a very long history of use in religious ceremonies, at funerals etc in the Orient and is widely sought after as an ingredient in perfumery. Commonly harvested from the wild, it is also to some extent cultivated; it is frequently planted around temples, houses and home gardens, whilst large scale industrial plantations have been initiated in Vietnam.
Exploitation of the diseased wood for the perfume industry has resulted in population declines in Vietnam exceeding 80% over recent years. There is a strong indication that the same losses are occurring in the rest of Indo-China. Based mainly on the situation in Vietnam, this species is classified as ‘Critically Endangered’ in the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species(2011)

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Aquilaria Malaccensis

Aquilaria malaccensis is a species of plant in the Thymelaeaceae family. It is found in Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand. It is threatened by habitat loss.

Aquilaria malaccensis is the major source of agarwood, a resinous heartwood, used for perfume and incense. The resin is produced by the tree in response to infection by a parasitic ascomycetous mould, Phaeoacremonium parasitica, a dematiaceous (dark-walled) fungus.

The World List of Threatened Trees (Oldfield et al., 1998) listed Iran as one of the countries with a population of A. malaccensis, but an exploratory 2002 CITES review confirmed that Iran has no record of the species. As a result Iran is no longer considered as habitat for or producer of agarwood


Otherwise known as Aloes wood and Malacca eagle-wood, Agar wood (Aquilaria malaccensis) is a tropical small tree that grows up to 40 m high and spreads up to 12 m wide. It has a pale, thin and smooth trunk, silky young shoots, and leathery, long, sword-shaped leaves that are arranged alternately. Its white flowers are in clusters and its fruits are egg shaped and velvety. Edible parts are the seeds and bark. It is used to flavour curries. Aquilaria malaccensis, like other species from the Aquilaria genus, is a major source of agar wood resin that is used for perfume and incense. The resin is produced when the tree is infected by a parasitic fungus, Phaeoacremonium parasitica. The incense is used against cancer in Western, Chinese, and Indian medicine. Agar wood is used to relieve spasms and to lower fever. In China, it is used as a sedative against abdominal complaints, asthma, colic and diarrhoea. It also is an aphrodisiac and carminative. The incense also functions as an insect repellent. The inner bark is used in making cloth, ropes, and writing materials. The timber of healthy trees is used for making boxes, in light construction, and veneer. Other Names: Agarwood tree, Agar, Akyaw, Sasi, Aloes Wood, Malacca eagle-wood.

Agar wood is an astringent, stimulant, tonic herb that relieves spasms, especially of the digestive and respiratory systems, and lowers fevers. In Western, Chinese and Indian medicines the incense is used against cancer, especially of the thyroid gland. In China it is applied as a sedative against abdominal complaints, asthma, colic and diarrhoea, and as an aphrodisiac and carminative. The grated wood enters into various preparations used especially during and after childbirth, and to treat rheumatism, smallpox and abdominal pains. Decoctions of the wood are said to have anti-microbial properties, e.g. Against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Shigella flexneri.

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Aquilaria Hirta

Aquilaria hirta is a small, evergreen tree growing up to 14 metres tall. The wood of all members of this genus, when infected with a fungus, becomes a source of agarwood, which is very aromatic and highly valued as an incense, perfume and medicine. The plant also provides a useful fibre.

The fungi-infected heartwood has a high commercial value and numerous trees are cut down, many of them uninfected by the fungus, in order to harvest just a few kilograms of the diseased wood. The increase in levels of trade over the past decade has resulted in overexploitation throughout the range of this species. The plant is classified as ‘Vulnerable’ in the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species

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Aquilaria Cumingiana

Aquilaria cumingiana is an evergreen shrub or small tree that can grow up to 5 metres tall. The wood of all members of this genus, when infected with a fungus, becomes a source of agarwood, which is very aromatic and highly valued as an incense, perfume and medicine. The plant also provides a useful fibre.

The fungi-infected heartwood has a high commercial value and numerous trees are cut down, many of them uninfected by the fungus, in order to harvest just a few kilograms of the diseased wood. The increase in levels of trade over the past decade has resulted in overexploitation throughout the range of this species. The plant is classified as ‘Vulnerable’ in the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species

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Aquilaria Filaria

Aquilaria filaria is an evergreen shrub or a tree that can grow up to 17 metres tall. The bole can be up to 50cm in diameter.

The wood of all members of this genus, when infected with a fungus, becomes a source of agarwood, which is very aromatic and highly valued as an incense, perfume and medicine. The plant also provides a useful fibre.

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Aquilaria Microcarpa

Aquilaria microcarpa is an evergreen tree that can grow up to 40 metres tall. The bole can be up to 80cm in diameter.

The wood of all members of this genus, when infected with a fungus, becomes a source of agarwood, which is very aromatic and highly valued as an incense, perfume and medicine. The plant also provides a useful fibre.
The fungi-infected heartwood has a high commercial value and numerous trees are cut down, many of them uninfected by the fungus, in order to harvest just a few kilograms of the diseased wood. The increase in levels of trade over the past decade has resulted in overexploitation throughout the range of this species. The plant is classified as ‘Vulnerable’ in the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species

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Aquilaria Beccariana

Aquilaria Beccariana is an evergreen tree that can grow up to 28 metres tall. The bole can be up to 36cm, exceptionally to 91cm in diameter and is sometimes fluted at the base.

This species is a major source of agarwood, which is very aromatic and highly valued as an incense, perfume and medicine. The plant also provides a useful fibre and wood.
The fungi-infected heartwood has a high commercial value and numerous trees are cut down, many of them uninfected by the fungus, in order to harvest just a few kilograms of the diseased wood. The increase in levels of trade over the past decade has resulted in overexploitation throughout the range of this species. The plant is classified as ‘Vulnerable’ in the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species

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Delivery Instructions

FOR LOCAL ORDERS:
Order cut-off time is every Saturdays 12noon.
Confirmed Order despatched: Every Mondays and Tuesdays
Delivery is within 2 days time for Metro Manila and 2-3 days time for Luzon, Visayas and Mindanao areas. Always ask for the Courier Tracking Number of confirmed despatched for follow-ups.

IMPORTED ORDERS:
Delivery Lead time: 15 -30 days